Political philosophy

A Teacher of Thought: 60 Years on

08.01.2022

Aleksander Dugin has acquired enormous scholarship in the history of world philosophy, mastering the depths of Guénon and Heidegger, Schelling and Brentano, Plato and Aristotle, Porphyry and Erigena. But all the grandiose apparatus of these great thinkers only allowed him to develop to the end the potential that Dugin possessed deep within himself already in his youth.

PAN-AFRICANISM ON THE MOVE

27.09.2021

Many people know the character Thomas Sankara or Muammar Kadhafi was, but few know the deep thoughts of these characters. Few people know the concept of Pan-Africanism (at least among non-African peoples). Yet it is a thought that has always been at the center of the African debate in every era, in every generation. We will try to understand together the origins of this ideal, its objectives and the problems that it has had to face in each era and continues to face. In this article, we will focus on the history of the Pan-African current, addressing its origins, the Afro-descendant resistance in the Americas, Garveyism, African independence, and then addressing the more political-contemporary part with the resistance movements in this XXI century, like NGO Urgences Panafricanistes of Kemi Seba, an organization that I coordinate in the African diaspora, precisely in Italy.

Philosophical conceptions of cultural space in Russia and Japan: comparing Nishida Κitaro - and Semen Frank

11.09.2021

Contemporary discussions on the 'new world order', at the moment they ground their arguments on 'cultural' elements, on the other hand, can easily shift towards a Huntington-style cultural essentialism. Ιn Natίon and Narratίon Bhabha (1990) argues against this tendency to essentialize Third World countries into a homogenous identity. At the  moment a worl order  is  no  longer  established 'artificially', -tha is,  with  the help of valid polίtίcal ideas. Cultural components are called for in order to establish  an 'organic' order by creating coalitions between cultures in an almost 'natural' way. Such ideas accord with  historical ideas of  Nishida or of  Eurasianism  only as long as we take a superficial look. The present paper was supposed to show that these Japanese and Russian philosophies developed concepts of space through which cultural communities appear as more than merely organic, self-enclosed units. These philosophies constantly confront the contemporary reader with a paradoxical conceptual linking of openness and closedness, of self-awareness and awareness of the other, of reality and transcendence. Ιn this way, they manage to overcome both particularism and universalism.